8 November – Back in Pokarha

It’s over. My knees are pleased but I always find the end of a trek a bit difficult. We got back into Pokarha this morning. The best part was a hot bath. Yes a real proper soak. Marvellous. Tendi took me and Furi out for lunch. It will be my treat for dinner. Tomorrow we get the bus back to Kathmandu.
I’ll include a couple of pictures with this post from the past wonderful week, then send the “blurb” in a bit.

This is where we stayed at Forest Camp. A really pretty place with a very cozy dining room. We stayed here one night on the way up and again on our return from the Mardi Himal trek.

This is where we stayed at Forest Camp. A really pretty place with a very cozy dining room. We stayed here one night on the way up and again on our return from the Mardi Himal trek.

This was the much less comfortable accommodation at Low Camp. Thankfully we only needed to spend one night here.  Mud floors and no glass in the windows.

This was the much less comfortable accommodation at Low Camp. Thankfully we only needed to spend one night here. Mud floors and no glass in the windows.

Tendi and I at High Camp at 6:30 on a very chilly morning, just before we headed up to a higher view point which you can see behind us.

Tendi and I at High Camp at 6:30 on a very chilly morning, just before we headed up to a higher view point which you can see behind us.

Us three intrepid trekkers, on our way down from High Camp.

Us three intrepid trekkers, on our way down from High Camp.

Fish Tail peak playing hide and seek with the fog.

Fish Tail peak playing hide and seek with the fog.

Some of the Mardi Himal trail was steep and rocky. It was all amazingly beautiful even in the fog.

Some of the Mardi Himal trail was steep and rocky. It was all amazingly beautiful even in the fog.

7 thoughts on “8 November – Back in Pokarha

  1. Hi Kim
    As usual your story does not disappoint me with the descriptions and personal moments you describe so well. I feel in some small way as if I’ve been there with you without all the hard work that would entail. How to go to Nepal without having to fly there! You certainly did have us all worried with the avalanche event and i am very happy to know you were not involved in that area. I was over to see Bill & Denise in October and I read some of your posts to Bill. He was quite impressed with the elevations you have reached and the lack of comforts you manage so well. Thanks for keeping us all posted with the day to day events in your journey. Have fun being a teacher instead of a climber for the remainder of your stay. 🙂 CA

    • Hi Carol, I was wondering if you were following along! Please tell Bill I’m sure he’d love it here! I spent this morning preparing lesson plans as I’m teaching written communication to grades 7, 8, 9, and 10 this year. I hope I’m up for the challenge! Small classes of about 20 per class. Phulu is in grade 7 now. This will be my third year with her class. The others will all be new for me. Having completed the lesson plans for this week I set off and had a wonderful afternoon enjoying my second most favourite activity – shopping – bartering – in Kathmandu! It was a most successful afternoon. Did you know that here one can even barter for the exchange rate! Seriously. Too much fun.

  2. Dear Kim, I have soooo enjoyed following your adventures. I was concerned during the big Avalanche but got out my maps an figured you were not there! I love your pics…you look so happy and strong…a trip of a life time. Yes, off the tourist routes a treat! Hugs, Joyce and Phyllis

    • Hi Joyce and Phyllis! Good to hear from you. Nice to know you’re enjoying my avalanche free adventures! Am back in Kathmandu this evening. Just walking from the bus to the hotel had me getting ferocious with cheeky motorcycle drivers. The road was more chaotic than normal as buildings along it are being torn down so the road can be widened – eventually. But meantime Kathmandu drivers are driving in the torn down rubble filled areas which is where pedestrians also have to pick their way. It makes for a dangerous mix of traffic. Far more dangerous than trekking in the Annapurna wilds! Still – I held my own! Easy to do seeing as poor Tendi was following along behind carrying both our packs. He refused to let me take mine – so I was “point” and cleared the way. We recovered ourselves with a beer here at the hotel upon arrival!
      So yes – I am feeling strong, and well, and despite Kathmandu’s bizarre traffic – happy. As you know this wee country is well under my skin. I hope to figure out my school schedule tomorrow- and thus will begin the next part of this adventure.

  3. Hi Kim,
    Another “Wow” – what a wonderful trek to a less travelled area. I thought of my trek into Gokyo with no crowds because everyone was either in Lukla waiting to get out or in Kathmandu waiting to get in. Congratulations on your latest achievement. the Nepali singers sounded wonderful. On my first 2 trips to Nepal, the porters sang a lot but now they all have radios, Ipods etc and listen to Bryan Adams “In the Summer of 69” without ear buds.
    Have fun with Karin.
    Love and hugs,
    Marianne

    • Hi Marianne. Brian Adams? Omg. Thankfully I’ve managed to avoid the pleasure! However I do know what you mean about the prevalence of music playing cell phones and what not! As soon as we got back to the major trekking route, the evening concerts stopped. The guesthouse in Pothana even had a great assortment of instruments but nobody played or sang. I asked about this because I’d enjoyed the music making so much. The word is that some tourists don’t like the “party atmosphere” preferring guides and porters to keep things quiet in the evenings so they can sleep undisturbed. Who knew?

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